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By Danielle Ohlemacher

CPS Policy Coordinator

On a mission course to help others?

Enjoy working with amazing people who share your passion?

Worked in the movement to end domestic violence? 

YOU MAY BE THE PERSON WE’RE LOOKING FOR!

Child Protective Services (CPS) Policy Coordinator

 You will be responsible for statewide training and technical assistance for all policy projects relating to issues involving domestic violence and child abuse and neglect. You will work primarily with Child Protective Services’ state and regional office staff and family violence program staff in specific Texas communities.

We are looking for a high-energy person who can interact with and engage policy makers, lobbyists, project stakeholders, community partners, and our member organizations. The person selected will have a bachelor’s degree, professional maturity, empathy for the population, strong presentation skills, and the ability to influence others. This person will also understand the current landscape of the Child Protective Services system and the Texas laws governing child protective services and domestic and family violence.

 For more information about the position please visit our website at http://tcfv.org/about/employment/.

To be considered, please remember to include a cover letter, a resume, and complete the online application. Send your materials to Kate McAlister

 

Texas Council on Family Violence Honors Four Outstanding Texas Leaders and Fathers for Father’s Day

For Immediate Release

MEDIA CONTACT: ANGELA HALE, 512.289.2995, angela@redmediagroup.com

 

Austin, Texas – June 16, 2016– This Father’s Day, The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) celebrates fathers who devote their lives to building safer communities for their kids and by doing so, impact future generations to come.  These dads lead by example, inspiring us all to envision a Texas free of violence – and strive tirelessly to accomplish this goal.  They are remarkable leaders in their professional lives, and remarkable fathers at home.

“Father’s Day is a very important day in the lives of children here in Texas and across the world.  It is a day of celebration to recognize the dedication and unconditional love fathers give to raise their children and help them become confident adults,” said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “A good father makes all the difference in a child’s life.  He’s a pillar of strength and support and he leads by example. We thank these wonderful dads and Texas leaders this Father’s Day.”

Thank you to these dads and happy Father’s Day!

This Father’s Day TCFV recognizes:

  • Representative Abel Herrero, Robstown, TX
  • Coach Josh Ragsdale, South Garland High School, Garland, TX
  • Judge Tano Tijerina, County Judge of Webb County, Laredo, TX
  • Mayor Sylvester Turner, Houston, TX

 

Representative Abel Herrero has dedicated his career to serving the Robstown-area for more than 17 years, first as city council member, and then as state representative.  As chair of the House Committee on Criminal Jurisprudence, Rep. Herrero has been an energetic ally in promoting laws that help domestic violence survivors. Last session, he successfully stewarded a law to allow juries to hear more information about an abuser’s past violence – a transformational improvement for victims seeking justice. “As these survivors take brave steps towards breaking the cycle of violence, I am proud to have played even a small part in providing a hopeful path forward,” said Rep. Herrero.

Representative Herrero is a father to five: Annalisa – 17, Andrea – 12, Abel Jr. -10, Alexia – 8, and Aliana – 6. “Cherish every moment with your children because time will not stand still, but most of all, because they are your greatest blessings.”

 

Coach Josh Ragsdale, South Garland High School, Garland, TX- On Coach Ragsdale’s team, respect for women is the standard. Every student on his football team pledges to help stop domestic violence. It’s part of Coach Ragsdale’s Domestic Violence Awareness Project, an effort he has lead for the last three years. The project has been a major success, spurring universities to create programs to teach about dating and sexual violence and encourage their own teams to “take the pledge.” More recently, Coach Ragsdale has joined TCFV’s Coaches’ Leadership Crew to help expand teen dating violence programs to more sports programs.

Coach Ragsdale is a father of three: Natalie – 12, Valerie – 12 and Ryan – 1. His parenting philosophy? “Don’t be afraid to use the words ‘I love you.’ I regularly tell my wife how much I love her in front of my children and hug and kiss on her. I want them to see me treat her like the queen that she deserves to be treated like. In turn, I want my girls to expect to be treated the same way and be respected for the wonderful ladies that they are. I also want my son to ‘want to be like daddy.’  I want him to grow up with a servant’s heart and a man who fully respects women.”

 

For Judge Tano Tijerina, service to his community is a family value. The Webb County native and former professional baseball player comes from a family of civil servants. Perhaps that history contributed to his desire to go above and beyond the job of judge to become a moral leader in his community. Last year, Judge Tijerina launched the Be A Man and Stand Up Campaign, calling on Texas men to be active participants in the movement to end violence against women in Texas.

Judge Tijerina is a father of four: Bonnie Jean – 19, Cayetano Isaac – 16, Christopher Alfonso – 11, and Keith Alexander – 11. When it comes to parenting, he says: “Allow your kids to be their own persona with guidance and love, and the rest is just details.”

 

Mayor Sylvester Turner has consistently and enthusiastically raised the profile of domestic violence services in Houston during his tenure as Mayor. He has also been an active leader in promoting Texas values of respect for diversity and tolerance. Prior to his work as mayor, he spent 27 years representing Houstonians in the Texas House, where he served on the budget committee and helped secure full funding for family violence programs.

Mayor Turner is a proud father to daughter Ashley. Ashley is continuing the family tradition of public service in the healthcare field. Some of the best advice he has received? “When times were rough, [my mother] told us that tomorrow would be better than today. Today, it is evident that what my mom said is very true.”

 

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Texas Council on Family Violence is the only 501(c) 3 nonprofit coalition in Texas dedicated solely to creating safer communities and freedom from family violence. With a state-wide reach and direct local impact, TCFV, with the collective strength of more than 1000 members, shapes public policy, equips service providers, and initiates strategic prevention efforts. Visit us online at http://www.tcfv.org/

Dads Matter – Happy Father’s Day!

For Father’s Day, TCFV celebrates fathers who devote their lives to building safer communities for their kids and by doing so, impact future generations to come. These dads lead by example, inspiring us all to envision a Texas free of violence – and strive tirelessly to accomplish this goal. They are remarkable leaders in their professional lives, and remarkable fathers at home.
 
Thank you to these dads and happy Father’s Day!

Representative Abel Herrero, Robstown, TX

Representative Abel Herrero has dedicated his career to serving the Robstown-area for more than 17 years, first as city council member, and then as state representative. As chair of the House Committee on Criminal Jurisprudence, Rep. Herrero has been an energetic ally in promoting laws that help domestic violence survivors. In the 84th session, he successfully stewarded a law to allow juries to hear more information about an abuser’s past violence – a transformational improvement for victims seeking justice. “As these survivors take brave steps towards breaking the cycle of violence, I am proud to have played even a small part in providing a hopeful path forward,” said Rep. Herrero.

Representative Herrero is a father to five: Annalisa – 17, Andrea – 12, Abel Jr. – 10, Alexia – 8, and Aliana – 6. “Cherish every moment with your children because time will not stand still, but most of all, because they are your greatest blessings.”

Coach Josh Ragsdale, South Garland High School, Garland, TX

On Coach Ragsdale’s team, respect for women is the standard. Every student on his football team pledges to help stop domestic violence. It’s part of Coach Ragsdale’s Domestic Violence Awareness Project, an effort he has lead for the last three years. The project has been a major success, spurring universities to create programs to teach about dating and sexual violence and encourage their own teams to “take the pledge.” More recently, Coach Ragsdale has joined TCFV’s Coaching Leadership Group to help expand teen dating violence programs to more sports programs.

Coach Ragsdale is a father of three: Natalie – 12, Valerie – 12 and Ryan – 1. His parenting philosophy? “Don’t be afraid to use the words ‘I love you.’ I regularly tell my wife how much I love her in front of my children and hug and kiss on her. I want them to see me treat her like the queen that she deserves to be treated like. In turn, I want my girls to expect to be treated the same way and be respected for the wonderful ladies that they are. I also want my son to ‘want to be like daddy.’ I want him to grow up with a servant’s heart and a man who fully respects women.”

Judge Tano Tijerina, County Judge of Webb County, Laredo, TX

For Judge Tano Tijerina, service to his community is a family value. The Webb County native and former professional baseball player comes from a family of civil servants. Perhaps that history contributed to his desire to go above and beyond the job of judge to become a moral leader in his community. Last year, Judge Tijerina launched the Be A Man and Stand Up Campaign, calling on Texas men to be active participants in the movement to end violence against women in Texas.

Judge Tijerina is a father of four: Bonnie Jean – 19, Cayetano Isaac – 16, Christopher Alfonso – 11, and Keith Alexander – 11. When it comes to parenting, he says: “Allow your kids to be their own persona with guidance and love, and the rest is just details.”

Mayor Sylvester Turner, Houston, TX

Mayor Sylvester Turner has consistently and enthusiastically raised the profile of domestic violence services in Houston during his tenure as Mayor. He has also been an active leader in promoting Texas values of respect for diversity and tolerance. Prior to his work as mayor, he spent 27 years representing Houstonians in the Texas House, where he served on the budget committee and helped secure full funding for family violence programs.
Mayor Turner is a proud father to daughter Ashley. Ashley is continuing the family tradition of public service in the healthcare field. Some of the best advice he has received? “When times were rough, [my mother] told us that tomorrow would be better than today. Today, it is evident that what my mom said is very true.”


Do you want to learn more about TCFV’s work and stay up-to-date with new resources? Sign up for our email list! 

Family Violence Services Coordinator

Job Title: Family Violence Services Coordinator
Reports To: Family Violence Services Manager
FLSA Status: Full Time/Non-Exempt
Approved by: Director, Support to Service Providers

I. Purpose & Summary of Position:

The Texas Council on Family Violence is a statewide organization representing a network of domestic violence programs that provide direct services to victims and their families, and serves as the voice of victims at the state level while working with local communities to create strategies to prevent family violence.

The Family Violence Services Coordinator builds relationships and develops resources that enhance and support capacity building and technical assistance for family violence programs and Battering Intervention and Prevention Programs (BIPP) in assigned regions of the state. The Family Violence Services Coordinator coordinates and facilitates training, audits BIPP programs to insure compliance with funder guidelines and minimum standards, plans conference and training events and leads specialized projects. This position requires high degrees of professionalism, energy, adaptability, and attention to detail with a strong ability to strengthen relationships, collaborate, and respond to constituent needs.

II. Priority Functions / Accountabilities

1. Cultivates and maintains relationships with program leadership and other staff at family violence and BIPP programs as well as other stakeholders to enhance capacity of programs to provide services to family violence survivors and offenders:

  • Assesses and responds to needs of local family violence and battering intervention programs by working collaboratively with other TCFV staff and local program leadership.
  • Develops knowledge and stays current on trends, innovations and best practices on a state and national level in the fields of victim services and battering intervention.
  • Responds to requests for technical assistance from regional family violence and BIP programs and other constituents in a supportive, timely manner.
  • Proactively provides individual and program members with current regional and statewide family violence information.
  • Coordinates annual membership meetings and regional trainings within assigned regions.

2. Develops and implements resources, events and materials that strengthen the capacity of family violence and battering intervention programs statewide:

  • Identifies local, regional and statewide programmatic needs and trends and makes recommendations for program and strategy changes and/or improvements.
  • Develops, facilitates and evaluates training sessions, technical assistance, publications, web content and other capacity building options for statewide family violence programs and BIPPs.
  • Plans, develops, and coordinates statewide conferences, webinars, educational sessions and training toolkits.
  • Serves as lead on signature capacity building project by developing project vision, timeline, and budget, working with sub-contractors, speakers and presenters, providing leadership within team to involve team members in completing project.

3. Audits state-funded battering intervention programs to assess compliance to state guidelines and minimum standards:

  • Develops knowledge and stays current on state guidelines, offender accountability models and curricula, strategies for holding offenders accountable, and an understanding of how BIPPs contribute to victim safety.
  • Contributes to team efforts in the development and enhancement of audit materials and processes.
  • Evaluates compliance with state guidelines by monitoring groups and examining program files and documentation and preparing a thorough written report.

4. Financial / Administrative

  • Utilizes agency’s resources responsibly.
  • Ensures timely and accurate reporting of grant activities, including contributing information for agency’s funding applications.
  • Prepares, manages, and adheres to annual work plan and budget for project activities.
  • Assists in ensuring compliance with all TCFV contracts.

III. Minimum Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities Required: To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential duty satisfactorily.  The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required.  Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.

  • Critical analytical skills to understand the political, social, financial and external issues affecting service providers; ability to foresee and interpret trends and the dynamic changing needs of TCFV members and to develop processes and resources to respond effectively and in a timely manner.
  • Thorough knowledge of domestic violence issues and circumstances faced by those experiencing domestic violence.
  • Communication skills that analyze for audience and purpose and are suitable for presentation and written publication, and strong presentation skills and public speaking abilities.
  • Exceptional interpersonal skills to elicit commitment to and advancement of TCFV’s mission and vision both internally and externally and to respond diplomatically to challenging issues.
  • Strong ability to give and receive feedback with openness and respect.
  • Strong team building, leadership and project coordination skills to effectively guide statewide response to changing environments.
  • Self-starter, energetic, able to work independently, enjoys creating and implementing new initiatives and thrives in a dynamic environment.
  • Demonstrated ability to work under tight and/or changing timelines with adaptability, flexibility and attention to detail.
  • Strong time management skills to coordinate and prioritize own and others’ activities, evaluate progress, and to allocate resources to complete activities with set deadlines.
  • A minimum of two years’ experience (three preferred) in domestic violence programs, which includes providing direct services to survivors and knowledge of BIPP.
  • Bachelor’s Degree in a related field or any combination of related education and experience with a documented record of the ability to perform duties and responsibilities of the position.
  • Working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite; and demonstrated ability to learn new software as needed.
  • Bi-lingual Spanish language skills preferred.  

IV. Working Conditions and Environment/Physical Demands: Ability to read, write and converse in English, and to travel overnight extensively and tolerate prolonged sitting or standing.  Must possess the emotional and physical stamina to deal with a variety of stressful situations, such as: responding to complaints; handling difficult internal and external interactions; effectively working long and, at times, odd hours; maintaining a professional attitude throughout.

The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and minimum level of work being performed.  They are not intended to be construed as exhaustive of all duties, responsibilities and skills required for the position.  The employee will be required to perform any other job-related duties as required by the job objectives, the Family Violence Services Manager and mission and philosophy of TCFV. 

 Application Instructions: Download the application and submit with your resume and cover letter to Kate McAlister.

Supporting LGBT Victims & Survivors – Pride Month

June is LGBT Pride Month and TCFV is highlighting the importance of recognizing and supporting LGBT victims and survivors of domestic violence. One in four people in a same-sex relationship will experience domestic violence in their lifetime, a similar rate to women in heterosexual relationships. Tragically, five Texans who identified as LGBT were murdered by abusive current or ex-partners in 2015. These individuals came from diverse regions of Texas, including El Paso, Austin, Marietta, and Tyler.

Many lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people don’t seek help from family violence programs. Our social attitudes – about gender, about sexuality, and about violence – can be very real, significant barriers to making sure that everyone has access to safe services. And while intimate partner violence in LGBT relationships has many similarities to violence in heterosexual relationships, there are some key differences that significantly impact the way survivors get help.

Similarities:

  • The abuser’s goal is power, dominance and control.
  • Abuse can continue even after one partner leaves and is common.
  • Abuse can take many forms: physical, emotional, financial, and sexual abuse.
  • Under-reporting is common.

Differences:

  • Seeking help can mean coming out.
  • Seeking help can mean outing a partner.
  • The abuser can use homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia as additional tools for abuse.
  • The abuse can wrongly be perceived as mutual.
  • Legal remedies, resources, and support structures may be limited.

What You Can Do:

Everyone has a role to play in promoting safe and healthy relationships. The most important thing you can do to help? Stand up against homophobia and transphobia wherever you see it. Homophobia and transphobia hurt everyone, but discrimination can be life-threatening for the most vulnerable among us, including survivors of domestic violence. By calling out homophobia and transphobia wherever you see it, you can help change our culture so that survivors can get help when they need it.

TCFV’s LGBT Stakeholder Group works to advocate for the inclusion of LGBT voices in the work to end violence and to advocate for the needs of LGBT survivors. Currently, the Stakeholder Group is working to research and analyze the intimate partner murders of LGBT Texans.

Here are some tips you can use to make space for LGBT victims of domestic violence:

  • Use gender-neutral language when possible – In some contexts, it can be helpful to acknowledge that women are the majority of victims and men are the majority of offenders, but unless you have a specific reason to use gendered language, try using gender neutral language to be more inclusive.
  • Use mirroring language for sexual and gender identification – Mirroring language means using the same terms as the person you are speaking with, including pronouns, sexual identification, and gender identification. If you aren’t sure what words to use, ask.
  • Make connections within your local community – Make a point of reaching out to local organizations in your community that support LGBT folks. Prevention and outreach events are good opportunities to build community connections.
  • Educate yourself about the issues – Take the time to learn about LGBT issues. The more you know, the more good you can do.

TCFV is committed to helping every Texas program serve LGBT victims of domestic violence. Have questions? Call our TA line at 1-800-525-1978 for more support.


Do you want to learn more about TCFV’s work and stay up-to-date with new resources? Sign up for our email list! 

Texas Council on Family Violence Celebrates and Honors Five Fabulous  Women Leaders from Across Texas This Mother’s Day

Austin, TX (May 9, 2017)-This Mother’s Day the Texas Council on Family Violence is celebrating all the wonderful Texas moms who are making a difference in the lives of Texans.

TCFV praises the leadership of women who have made it their life’s work to empower other women. These women created remarkable services and policies, and challenge conditions that permit domestic violence to occur. These extraordinary women are also exceptional mothers. Thank you for making the world a better place.

“We are here today to honor all the mothers in Texas. The mother’s we have lost, the mothers who are here and the grandmothers who are now raising their grandchildren or never got to meet their grandchild because their mom was taken away in violent act of murder.  We are here, because we believe lives will be saved and we want to help people recognize the signs of domestic violence and empower them to help friends and co-workers who are in abusive relationships before it is too late,” said Gloria Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.

Annette Burrhus-Clay, Texas Association Against Sexual Assault – Austin, TX

Annette Burrhus-Clay has given selflessly of her time, talents and treasures to ameliorate violence against women. Her commitment is evidenced by her remarkable 21-year tenure at the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault. Annette is a fierce activist to the core, and her work influences state and national practice and policy. While her heart belongs to her four adult children, the center of her universe are her six grandchildren: Brayden, Anaya, Beau, Camille, Ami and two-week-old Norah.

“Kids taught me that I’m more capable than I thought and had a greater capacity for love than I imagined. Grandkids have taught me to let go of the unimportant things that keep us distracted or angry.”

Connie Gray, Focusing Families – Hempstead, TX

Connie Gray wears many hats at Focusing Families – children’s counselor, prevention director, and even mom! Connie’s adult daughter, Nicole, works alongside her at the agency, inspired by her mom’s passion. Together, they work in schools to change the culture and equip young people with the tools they need to empower themselves and build connections within their communities.

Connie is a steadfast advocate for young people. As a mom of three, her kids inspire her as much as she’s inspired them. “They taught me to believe the impossible and dream big.”

Rosa Hopkins, Women’s Center of East Texas – Longview, TX

Rosa Hopkins is the BIPP Coordinator at the Women’s Center of East Texas, where she works to hold batterers accountable and teach them the fundamentals of leading healthy, nonviolent relationships. She started working with offenders as an independent BIPP counselor because she saw the need in her community.

Rosa is well-respected in the community as a gifted and committed facilitator. Working with offenders isn’t always easy, but Rosa is driven by her compassion. Her own background – she is a survivor of domestic violence now happily married and the mother of two sons – fuels her empathy and ability to build connections in her work. “They’re human beings – I’m here to be an example of what kindness looks like, what human compassionate looks like.”

Toni Johnson-Simpson, Denton County Friends of the Family – Denton, TX

Toni Johnson-Simpson’s journey towards executive leader of the Denton County Friends of the Family started as an altruistic 21-year-old college student. Her passion has never flagged since. Toni expects more from her community in regard to victim compassion, batterer accountability and access to services because she knows that all children deserve it. And while her professional accomplishments are impressive, her personal ones monumental. Toni is a mom to three: daughter Ebonie and twins Justin and Jaydah. Toni credits her children for teaching her to love and to take time to enjoy life. When things get difficult she embraces wise words from Jaydah: “I’m going to celebrate how much I DID get done because I am still fabulous.” Yes, Toni – you are.

Rosie Martinez- Victims Unit Director at Hidalgo County Criminal District Attorney’s office

Rosie Martinez has dedicated her career of over 16 years to victim services and currently serves as the Victims Unit Director at Hidalgo County Criminal District Attorney’s office. Victims’ services has been more than a career for Rosie; she calls it her “passion and lifetime mission,” and it shows in her leadership throughout the community. Rosie volunteers on the Hidalgo County Family Violence Task Force, Rio Grande Valley Human Trafficking Coalition, Child Fatality Review Team, Citizen’s Review Team of DFPS, and the Hidalgo County Truancy Policy Committee.   A mom to five and grandmother of three, Rosie says her kids drive her work. “The sense of accomplishment that comes from hearing your children tell you that you are their inspiration, their role model, that they are proud of you and that they want to be like you is the best feeling in life.”

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Texas Council on Family Violence is the only 501(c) 3 nonprofit coalition in Texas dedicated solely to creating safer communities and freedom from family violence. With a state-wide reach and direct local impact, TCFV, with the collective strength of more than 1000 members, shapes public policy, equips service providers, and initiates strategic prevention efforts. Visit us online at http://www.tcfv.org/

Moms Make a Difference!

On Mother’s Day, TCFV acknowledges the leadership of women who have made it their life’s work to empower other women. These women create remarkable services and policies and challenge conditions that permit violence to occur. These extraordinary women are also exceptional mothers. Thank you for making the world a better place.

Annette Burrhus-Clay, Texas Association Against Sexual Assault – Austin, TX

Annette Burrhus-Clay has given selflessly of her time, talents and treasures to ameliorate violence against women. Her commitment is evidenced by her remarkable 21-year tenure at the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault. Annette is a fierce activist to the core, and her work influences state and national practice and policy. While her heart belongs to her four adult children, the center of her universe are her six grandchildren: Brayden, Anaya, Beau, Camille, Ami and two-week-old Norah.

“Kids taught me to I’m more capable than I thought and had a greater capacity for love than I imagined. Grandkids have taught me to let go of the unimportant things that keep us distracted or angry.”

Connie Gray, Focusing Families – Hempstead, TX

Connie Gray wears many hats at Focusing Families – children’s counselor, prevention director, and even mom! Connie’s adult daughter, Nicole, works alongside her at the agency, inspired by her mom’s passion. Together, they work in schools to change the culture and equip young people with the tools they need to empower themselves and build connections within their communities.

Connie is a steadfast advocate for young people. {waiting for more context}. As a mom of three, her kids inspire her as much as she’s inspired them. “They taught me to believe the impossible and dream big.”

 

Rosa Hopkins, Women’s Center of East Texas – Longview, TX

Rosa Hopkins is the BIPP Coordinator at the Women’s Center of East Texas, where she works to hold batterers accountable and teach them the fundamentals of leading healthy, nonviolent relationships. She started working with offenders as an independent BIPP counselor because she saw the need in her community.

Rosa is well-respected in the community as a gifted and committed facilitator. Working with offenders isn’t always easy, but Rosa is driven by her compassion. Her own background – she is a survivor of domestic violence now happily married and the mother of two sons – fuels her empathy and ability to build connections in her work. “They’re human beings – I’m here to be an example of what kindness looks like, what human compassionate looks like.”

Toni Johnson-Simpson, Denton County Friends of the Family – Denton, TX

Toni Johnson-Simpson’s journey towards executive leader of the Denton County Friends of the Family started as an altruistic 21-year-old college student. Her passion has never flagged since. Toni expects more from her community in regards to victim compassion, batterer accountability and access to services because she knows that all children deserve it. And while her professional accomplishments are impressive, her personal ones monumental. Toni is a mom to three: daughter Ebonie and twins Justin and Jaydah.

Toni credits her children for teaching her to love and to take time to enjoy life. When things get difficult she embraces wise words from Jaydah: “I’m going to celebrate how much I DID get done because I am still fabulous.” Yes, Toni – you are.

 

Rosie Martinez

Rosie Martinez has dedicated her career of over 16 years to victim services and currently serves as the Victims Unit Director at Hidalgo County Criminal District Attorney’s office. Victims’ services has been more than a career for Rosie; she calls it her “passion and lifetime mission,” and it shows in her leadership throughout the community. Rosie volunteers on the Hidalgo County Family Violence Task Force, Rio Grande Valley Human Trafficking Coalition, Child Fatality Review Team, Citizen’s Review Team of DFPS, and the Hidalgo County Truancy Policy Committee.

A mom to five and grandmother of three, Rosie says her kids drive her work. “The sense of accomplishment that comes from hearing your children tell you that you are their inspiration, their role model, that they are proud of you and that they want to be like you is the best feeling in life.”


Stay up-to-date with TCFV news and resources: sign up for our email list!