Home » Blog

    Statement on Recent ICE Activities Regarding Family Victims in El Paso

    The Texas Council on Family Violence, the Center Against Sexual and Family Violence and the below-listed El Paso area elected officials stand together in recognizing that:

    • Texas family violence centers served over 72,000 victims last year alone.
    • 158 women were killed by their male intimate partner in 2015. 
    • 39% of all who sought services were turned away due to lack of space and resources. 

    Realizing these needs and the DEADLY reality of family violence, we join together to call on all policy makers in El Paso and Texas overall to hold tight to three fundamental core values for family violence victims:

    • Victims of family violence have the right to protection using the civil and criminal justice system.
    • ALL family violence victims and the communities in which they live deserve safety from harm.  This makes our communities safer.
    • Vital to this safety, family violence victims must have unfettered access to law enforcement and the courthouse.

    Gloria Terry, TCFV

    Stephanie Karr, Center Against Sexual and Family Violence

    Jo Anne Bernal, El Paso County Attorney

    Jaime Esparza, 34th Judicial District Attorney, TCFV Board Member

    Congressman Beto O’Rourke

    Senator Jose Rodriguez

    County Judge Veronica Escobar

    Representative Joe Pickett

    Representative Joe Moody

    Representative Mary Gonzalez

    Representative Cesar Blanco

    Representative Evelina Ortega

    More

    5 Reasons to Sign the Purple Postcard: Legislative Agenda

    When you Purple_Postcard_Iconsign the Purple Postcard you support our Legislative Agenda to help Texas domestic violence survivors. The common thread of the Legislative Agenda this session? Empowering survivors and supporting their safety planning. Here are five ways to support survivors this legislative session: 

    1) Fully fund domestic violence programs that provide shelter and other services to victims

    In 2015, 158 women were killed by a male intimate partner. That same year, 39% of requests for services were turned away due to lack of resources.  When you sign the Purple Postcard, you become part of a network of dedicated individuals and organizations advocating for the importance of domestic violence services. Now is a critical time to stand up for survivors and tell your legislators that you support full funding for domestic violence programs.

    2) Keep survivors’ home addresses confidential 

    Everyone deserves to be safe at home. For victims of domestic violence, part of safety planning can be keeping their home address private. While current laws allows survivors to make their addresses confidential in certain public records, there are still loopholes. For example, owning a home may put a victim’s address in the public record, allowing an abuser to potentially locate the victim. Tell your legislator to close the loopholes and make it easier for victims to keep their homes safe.

    3) Protect victims from extreme and long-term abuse

    Protective orders provide an added level of security for survivors. Unfortunately, Texas protective orders rarely last longer than two years, and some judges enter them for even shorter periods of time. Under the current law, only some survivors can be granted a protective order that lasts longer than two years. Often, victims who have been threatened with guns, hit by vehicles, or even stabbed are not granted long-term protective orders. Call on your legislator to update the rules and make sure that victims can access long-term protective orders.

    4) Train child custody mediators on domestic violence 

    Domestic violence makes decisions on child custody even more complex. Child custody professionals need training on domestic violence to help keep survivors and their children safe. Currently, mediators that handle child custody cases have no domestic violence training requirements. Lawyers and advocates agree – survivor parents use mediation, so mediators need the tools to identify and respond to abusive behavior in mediation. Let your legislator know that domestic violence training for mediators helps keep survivors and children safer.

    5) Allow domestic violence survivors to get services privately and confidentially 

    Intimate partner violence is just that – intimate. Vulnerable Texans should be able to get the help they need from domestic violence programs and safely share intimate details that will promote their healing without having to worry that it will become public. Unlike the majority of states, Texas has not yet granted critical confidentiality protections to bolster federal protections. State privacy and confidentiality protections would support the ability of victims to seek help when they need it most. Support a victim’s right to seek help confidentially.

    Sign the Purple Postcard to support the legislative agenda: 



      Get updates on TCFV's legislative agenda, trainings and other news!
    • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.


    More

    Honoring the Stories of Survivors

    “She was the glue who kept her family together.”

    “Committed her life to showing kindness to those around her.”

     “Passionate about the welfare of others, always lending a helping hand, ensuring all were treated fairly.”

    “Never afraid to follow her dreams.”

    -Families & friends describe women killed by domestic violence
     
    In 2015, 158 women were murdered by a male intimate partner in Texas: the highest TCFV has ever recorded. The number is shocking, but it’s not unusual. Every year, more than 100 women are killed in Texas by a boyfriend, ex-boyfriend, husband or ex-husband.
     
    At TCFV, we are committed to telling the story of domestic violence in Texas. Since 1990, we’ve published the Honoring Texas Victims report – because we know that every woman deserves to be counted. Within this report, you’ll find factual accounts of the women killed by their partners, telling each story with utmost care and respect. I hope that you will take a moment to reflect on some of these women’s stories. It is heartbreaking, necessary work to bring domestic violence out of the shadows.

    Yet the story of fatalities is sadly just the tip of the iceberg where Texas domestic violence is concerned. Nationally, one in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. In Texas, that number rises to one in three. Chances are that someone you know – if not you – has experienced domestic violence in her lifetime.

    Now more than ever, it’s essential that we work together to tell the story of domestic violence in Texas. Family violence is knowable, predictable, and preventable. Knowing the facts about domestic violence is the first step in being able to keep victims safe and hold offenders accountable. 
     
    At the start of a new year, we want to make sure you have the resources you need to tell your story. Our new Learn the Facts statistics resource page is designed to be your one shop stop for facts about domestic violence in Texas. The charts, posters, infographics and reports found on this page will help you elevate the voice of survivors and share the facts about domestic violence in your community. We can’t wait to hear what you think – so let us know!

     
     
    Want to stay up-to-date with Texas domestic violence news and TCFV's work? Join our email list!
    More

    Young Hearts Matter Day of Action!

    YHM_Logo_630x425

    Young Hearts Matter Day of Action!

    February 1, 2017

    Texas Capitol - South Steps
    1100 Congress Ave, Austin, TX 78701
    2:00 PM

    Young activists from across the state are invited to join the Texas Advocacy Project and TCFV’s Young Hearts Matter Leadership Board on the south steps of the Capitol for a press conference kicking off National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month followed by an invitation to visit their legislators.

    Questions? Contact Jessica Moreno for more information. 

     

    Hosted by:  

    TAP-Logo TCFV_Logo
    More

    Domestic Violence and Firearms

    firearms

    Does having a gun in the home keep you safer? For victims of domestic violence, the answer is a resounding no.

    Domestic violence abusers can use to firearms threaten, endanger, and intimidate their victims in order to exercise power and control. In a recent survey of callers to the National Domestic Violence Hotline[i]:

    • 16% of the callers said their partners had access to guns, 22% of whom had threatened to use the firearm to kill the victim or her family or to kill themselves.
    • 10% said their partner had actually fired the gun in an argument.
    • 67% of the callers believed their partner was capable of killing them.

    Last year, 158 women were killed by a male intimate partner, 97 of them with a firearm.

    Under state and federal law, felons, respondents to protective orders, and convicted family violence abusers cannot possess firearms. Texas law allows the local criminal justice community to come together to implement firearm surrender protocols, however only a few have done so.

    Survivors, along with nearly 80% of Texans, support requiring domestic violence abusers to surrender their firearms.[ii] 

    Key jurisdictions have adopted firearm surrender protocols. For instance, Dallas County Judge Roberto Cañas led the development and implementation of a system in his jurisdiction tailored to work in that community. Bexar, El Paso and Travis Counties have also taken on similar bold efforts.

    TCFV works with communities to develop policies that keep survivors safe and hold offenders accountable. We provide education and support for cities and towns dedicated to disarming domestic violence abusers.

    Your support can help implement solutions that offer real world answers to lethal family violence. Sign the Purple Postcard to tell our legislators that you support full funding for domestic violence services. 



      Get updates on TCFV's legislative agenda, trainings and other news!
    • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.


    __________________________________________________________________

    [i] National Domestic Violence Hotline, “Firearms and Domestic Violence,” http://www.thehotline.org/resources/firearms-dv/(2014).
    [ii] Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research, “Texans Support Stronger Laws to Prevent Gun Violence (May 31, 2014). 

    More

    Your Advocacy At Work

    Purple_Postcard_Animation

    How can signing a simple postcard help build a safer Texas?

    Last legislative session, supporters of the Purple Postcard like you galvanized Texas lawmakers to protect and increase family violence program funding. In turn, programs across the state have been hard at work to turn that funding into safer communities.

    Childcare helps move survivors and their children forward

    In Dallas, new funding enabled the Family Place to deepen their services for child survivors of family violence. Their Child Development Center and School-Age Program provides childcare that specializes in the needs of child survivors: separation anxiety, grief, and fear. The childcare services help families heal and grow as well as allowing time for parents to look for a job or find housing.

    “Survivors have so much they have to do and so much weighing on them,” said Angela Walker, Vice President of Residential Services, “to know they can go out and their children are in the care of qualified professionals can have such a great impact on the future of that family.”

    Prevention work supports students and professionals

    In Sherman, Grayson Crisis Center is working to prevent violence before it happens. The school-based prevention program works with both students and school professionals to build confidence and skills. “Having a whole community to support the individual receiving the education is a critical component,” said Shelli Shields, Primary Prevention Coordinator. “When a student hears a consistent message from the program, from peers, from parents, from teachers, from other professionals, it will have a greater impact.”

    Funding from the last legislative session has allowed the program to continue for its third and fourth year and expand within the community. 

    Legal services offer guidance through complex issues

    Texas Advocacy Project is expanding their work to provide survivors with high-quality legal services thanks to new state funding. TAP helps survivors through the complex legal system, from prosecution of a perpetrator, to protective orders, to divorce and custody issues. “Many of these survivors have been told [by their abuser] that they’ll never get custody or a divorce, that no one will believe them,” said Heather Bellino, Executive Director of TAP, and getting access to legal services “can be that tipping point for someone.”

    With new state funding, TAP hired an additional staff attorney, which means they can provide support for an additional 700 cases as well as hundreds of hours of telephone service through the program’s legal hotline.

    In a single year, Texas family violence programs serve more than 70,000 women, children and men because home is not safe.


    Will you stand alongside Texas survivors and support full funding for services by signing the Purple Postcard?



      Get updates on TCFV's legislative agenda, trainings and other news!
    • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.


    More

    Working Together

    working_together

    In Laredo, Anjelica Martinez was murdered by her husband last year. Her three young children, ages 3, 8, and 9, are left without a mother.

    Pregnancy and early motherhood is a particularly dangerous time for women and their young children in an abusive relationship. Around 25% of women murdered by a male intimate partner last year were either pregnant or were mothers to young children, according to TCFV’s Honoring Texas Victims Report.

    “We know that domestic violence is exacerbated during pregnancy,” said Sister Rosemary Welsh, Executive Director at Casa de Misericordia. “But a lot of people don’t recognize [domestic violence] as a public health issue.”

    Doctors and patients have routine conversations about nutrition and exercise, but when was the last time your health care provider asked you about your relationship? Simple but effective screenings for domestic can help survivors get the help they need safely.

    Casa de Misericordia is partnering with local health care providers this week to recognize Health Cares About Domestic Violence (HCADV) Day on October 12. HCADV Day is an opportunity for health care providers and domestic violence advocates to build meaningful connections and promote tools and techniques to support survivors. 

    One key takeaway? “Look them in the eye,” advises Sister Rosemary to doctors and health care workers. “There are so many touchstones in how health providers can intervene in domestic violence.”

    She recounted the case of a woman with diabetes whose blood sugar continued to be high despite consistent check-ins at home and at the clinic. The promotores (community health workers) noticed that her husband was always with her and answered questions for her. “He wanted to come into the room at the clinic,” said Sister Rosemary, and when nurses turned him away, he gave his wife his phone – with a call connected so he could listen in.

    The promotores kept following up with the patient, and eventually she confided her abusive relationship. “She had told her physician when she was pregnant, but they didn’t do anything. We were the first people who seemed to care. She continues to come to us, and she knows there is a lifeline out there," explained Sister Rosemary. 

    Dr. Joselyn Fisher, Associate Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics at Baylor College of Medicine, recalled similar experiences. “I’ve seen many cases were women have been in abusive relationships for a long period of time and were never asked, and they experienced partner violence far longer than they might have.”

    Baylor College of Medicine is also planning to Go Purple this October. The campus will light their fountain up purple and hang purple lights to recognize domestic violence in their community, and share awareness posters with contact information for local shelters. The school will also host a panel that provides continuing medical education credits. 

    Want to get involved in Health Cares about Domestic Violence Day? Here’s three easy ways:

    1. Share a fact about health and domestic violence
    2. Join TCFV’s webinar: HCADV – The Texas Health Summit and Future Developments
    3. Sign the Purple Postcard below to tell your legislator you support family violence programs. 

    I support full funding for family violence services!



      Get updates on TCFV's legislative agenda, trainings and other news!
    • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.


    More

    Everyone Can Play A Role

    Pillich2Everyone can play a role in preventing domestic violence. Caring adults - educators, parents, and community members - play an important role in the lives of young people at a time when they are learning necessary skills to form positive relationships with others. Adults like Coach Pillich in Manor, TX work with young people to promote healthy relationships and prevent patterns of dating violence that can last into adulthood before they begin. This is why she is the 2016 Young Hearts Matter Advocate of the Year.

    Do you know a young activist or adult who partners with young people to prevent teen dating violence and domestic violence? Nominate them for the 2017 Young Hearts Matter Awards. Recipients are announced in February 2017 and receive a $200 honorarium. Nomination deadline: December 16th, 2016. Contact Jessica Moreno, Prevention Coordinator for more info. Jmoreno@tcfv.org

    Schools can play a role too! Submit a toolkit request form by December 16th and have the Young Hearts Matter toolkit delivered to campuses in your community in time for Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month in February! 

    YHM_Logo_630x425

    More

    The most common form of abuse

    financial_abuse

    Did you know that 99% of domestic violence survivors reported experiencing some form of financial abuse?

    Financial abuse focused on maintaining control and limiting a survivor’s access to financial resources. It includes:

    More

    5 Reasons to Sign the Purple Postcard

    Purple_Postcard_Animation

    1. You can amplify the voice of domestic violence survivors. 

    Sign the Postcard to show you stand alongside survivors. We are powerful when we speak in unison.

    2. 15,000 adults seeking shelter from an abusive relationship were turned away last year. 

    Nearly 40% of adults seeking shelter are turned away due solely to lack of space. Everyone deserves a place to stay when home is not safe. 

    3. Now is the best time to make our voices heard.

    The Texas legislature only meets every other year. Now is the best opportunity to make sure that funding for domestic violence services is preserved and increased.

    4. You believe in safe and healthy communities.

    What would our communities look like if safe and healthy relationships were the expectation for everyone? Working together, we can change community norms and promote values that help us all be safe. 

    5. Family violence murders are knowable, predictable and preventable.

    158 women were killed by a male intimate partner in 2015 - one death is too many. Domestic violence deaths exhibit predictable patterns. We can redouble our efforts to prevent them.

    I support full funding for family violence services!



      Get updates on TCFV's legislative agenda, trainings and other news!
    • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.


     

    More

    Spotlight on a Young Leader

    "I wasn't a typical high school," says Jimmy James, a quiet young man whose life changed by joining Houston Police Department's Youth Police Advisory Council (YPAC).

    "When I met Jimmy, he couldn't open his mouth. Now he won't shut it!" jokes his mentor Rhonda Collins Byrd.

    Recognizing that teens are overlooked, the chief of police convened YPAC where participants conduct service projects, facilitate Teen Court, and train peers and adults on dating violence and suicide prevention. The program has increased understanding and dialogue between HPD and area youth.

    More

    TCFV Honors Five Outstanding Texas Leaders and Fathers for Father’s Day

    For Immediate Release

    MEDIA CONTACT: ANGELA HALE, 512.289.2995, angela@redmediagroup.com

    THE TEXAS COUNCIL ON FAMILY VIOLENCE HONORS FIVE OUTSTANDING TEXAS LEADERS AND FATHERS FOR FATHER’S DAY

    Austin, Texas – June 16, 2016– This Father’s Day, The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) celebrates fathers who devote their lives to building safer communities for their kids and by doing so, impact future generations to come.  These dads lead by example, inspiring us all to envision a Texas free of violence – and strive tirelessly to accomplish this goal.  They are remarkable leaders in their professional lives, and remarkable fathers at home.

    “Father's Day is a very important day in the lives of children here in Texas and across the world.  It is a day of celebration to recognize the dedication and unconditional love fathers give to raise their children and help them become confident adults,” said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “A good father makes all the difference in a child’s life.  He’s a pillar of strength and support and he leads by example. We thank these wonderful dads and Texas leaders this Father’s Day.”

    This Father’s Day TCFV recognizes:

    • Texas State Senator Juan “Chuy” Hinojosa of McAllen
    • Judge Roberto Cañas, Dallas County Criminal Court #10
    • J. Staley Heatly, District Attorney of the 46th Judicial District Wilbarger, Hardeman and Foard counties
    • David Scott, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Public Administration, University of Texas at Tyler
    • Coach Joe Frank MartinezHead Football Coach and Athletic Coordinator at Travis High School

    More


    TCFV Honors Four Mothers who Empower Women

    For Immediate Release

    MEDIA CONTACT: ANGELA HALE, 512.289.2995, angela@redmediagroup.com

    THE TEXAS COUNCIL ON FAMILY VIOLENCE HONORS FOUR MOTHERS WHO EMPOWER WOMEN

    Austin, Texas – May 7, 2016–On Mother’s Day, TCFV acknowledges the leadership of women who have made it their life’s work to empower other women. These women create remarkable services and policies and challenge conditions that permit domestic violence to occur. These extraordinary women are also exceptional mothers. Thank you for making the world a better place.

    This Mother's Day TCFV recognizes:

    • Jennifer King, Region 3 Director, Texas Department of Criminal Justice
    • Maricarmen Garza, Victim Rights Group Coordinator & Attorney, Texas RioGrande Legal Aid
    • State Senator Jane Nelson
    • Marta Pelaez, CEO, Family Violence Prevention Services

    More


    A Grayson County Mother Who Lost Her Daughter and Unborn Granddaughter to Domestic Violence Speaks Out this Mother’s Day

    For Immediate Release

    MEDIA CONTACT: Susan Risdon, 214-226-6741, susan@redmediagroup.com

    A Grayson County Mother Who Lost Her Daughter and Unborn Granddaughter to Domestic Violence Speaks Out this Mother’s Day

    Texas Council on Family Violence, Grayson Crisis Center, Grayson County District Attorney, Denison Police Chief & a Mother of a Domestic Violence Victim Team Up to Raise Awareness in the Wake of Recent Domestic Violence Murders- Including a Multiple Domestic Violence Homicide Where the Husband Killed his Wife and the Entire Family

    Sherman, TX (May 3, 2016)-This Mother’s Day the Texas Council on Family Violence is partnering with the Grayson Crisis Center, law enforcement, the Grayson County District Attorney and city leaders to raise awareness about domestic violence and remember all of the mothers out there who were murdered by their husbands or boyfriends and who are not with us to celebrate Mother’s Day.

    “We are here today to honor all the mothers in Texas.  The mothers we have lost, the mothers who are here and the grandmothers who are now raising their grandchildren or never got to meet their grandchild because their mom was taken away in violent act of murder.  We are here, because we believe lives will be saved and we want to help people recognize the signs of domestic violence and empower them to help friends and co-workers who are in abusive relationships before it is too late,” said Gloria Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.

    Tara Woodlee lost her daughter Ashleigh Lindsey of Denison and her unborn grandchild to domestic violence.  They were murdered by her ex-boyfriend despite the fact that she moved multiple times and was attempting to come to the Grayson Crisis Center for help days before she was killed.

    “I will never forget my daughter's beautiful face, it was forever ruined.  Her face was distorted from the massive swelling, her eyes black and blue.  Speckles of blood spot like blisters all over her face.  Ashleigh's right hand was so burnt from trying to block the last shot that it was burned clear down to her elbow.  The nurses had to brown bag that hand for evidence.  At one point she went Code Blue, and I had to make the painful decision to have her revived.  Her dad was with me in the room as they brought Ashleigh back.  I made that choice hoping our little Patience could survive.  We waited, and then the doctors came in and said, Ashleigh would never recover and there was nothing they could do to save her.  We also waited for an OB/GYN Specialist hoping our precious Ashleigh could be kept on machines long enough to give our unborn granddaughter, Patience Lynn a chance at life.  The sonogram revealed her tiny baby heart was failing.  Once I knew Patience was truly gone, I was left alone with my daughter,” said Tara Woodlee. http://www.ashleighspatienceproject.com/index.html

    More


    Texas Council on Family Violence Kicks Off Campaign Called “Young Hearts Matter” to Raise Awareness During National Teen Dating Abuse Awareness Month in February

    TCFV Honors the 2016 Young Hearts Matter Advocate of the Year Manor Girls Athletic Coordinator Coach Jennifer Pillich 

    Austin, TX (February 16, 2016) – Today, Young Hearts Matter, a campaign to bring awareness to teen dating abuse, recognized key leaders across Texas during February, Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Month.  Teen dating abuse happens in every school across Texas and the United States.

    Events and programs to raise awareness allow students to come forward and get advice and help before a situation escalates to violent behavior.  In today’s environment, technology like social media and texting, can make it easy for teens and young adults to communicate, but it can also make it easy for a dating partner to use technology to harass, control and abuse their boyfriend or girlfriend.  The Texas Council on Family Violence is working to make sure students are engaged, educated and empowered to know their rights and know when they are involved in healthy and unhealthy dating relationships.

    “Our work forces us to witness the outcomes of unhealthy, unsafe relationships.  Texas lost 132 women to domestic violence last year, 5 were 19 or younger,” said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “We raise awareness during the month of February, not just for the 5 young women who were murdered, but but for the countless other young hearts who are entering, enjoying, and exploring romantic relationships.  We recognize key influencers that profoundly shape, guide and empower young Texans.  Coach Jennifer Pillich embodies the powerful connection to youth that builds confidence and support.”

    TCFV honored Coach Jennifer Pillich, Girls Athletic Coordinator, Manor ISD, Manor, Texas as Young Hearts Matter Advocate of the Year at the kick-off event for SafePlace in Austin.   This award recognizes an adult ally who partners with young people, is a leader for violence prevention in their community and has made prevention programming more accessible as a result of her efforts.

    More


    2016 YHM Award Nominees

    YHM_Logo_630x425The YHM Activist of the Year, Advocate of the Year, and Texas Partner for Change awards recognize individuals who inspire and lead their communities to promote healthy relationships for young hearts in Texas.

    Learn More

     

    More

    Texas Leaders Celebrate 25 Years of Directing the Work of the Domestic and Sexual Violence Movements

    Austin, TX – Each year, the Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) and the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault (TAASA) convene leaders from the domestic and sexual violence movements in Texas at the Annual Executive Directors’ Conference: Directing the Work.  This year marks the Silver Anniversary of this important gathering and, while not all of the attendees are the same, the legacy and impact of the work over the last quarter of a century will very much be present.

    “The Texas Council on Family Violence and our member organizations have gathered together for 25 years at an annual conference and diligently work to share strategies to reduce domestic violence in Texas.   While, we have made progress, domestic violence is still a deadly problem.   In 2014, over 84,000 Texas women and children sought shelter, counseling or housing services because their home was unsafe and filled with fear.  39% of requests for services went unmet because of lack of resources to meet their needs.  And most profoundly, 132 Texas women, ranging in age from 16 to 90, were killed by a male intimate partner.  We look forward bringing together domestic violence and sexual assault leaders to search for solutions to reduce sexual assault and domestic violence in Texas, “said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.

    More


    The Public Policy Committee

    Capitol_IconFor the 85th Legislative Session Public Policy Committee, TCFV calls on advocates, allies, colleagues and any who wants to affect legislative policy on family violence to complete an Interest Form.

    Learn More

     

    More

    Honoring Texas Victims Report

    The full Honoring Texas Victims Report for 2014 is now available.

    We pay tribute to the Texas women who lost their lives by memorializing their story with an account of their death. The full report offers analysis of data drawn from these stories. Our goal is to help communities identify and analyze distinguishing characteristics of these cases and creates a safer Texas for all women.

    Read Report

     

    More

    The San Antonio Battered Women and Children’s Shelter Kicks Off a Holiday Giving Campaign

    The San Antonio Battered Women and Children’s Shelter Kicks Off a Holiday Giving Campaign-- the Same Way Black Friday and Cyber Monday Kicked-Off the Holiday Shopping Season -- But Contributing to this Cause Can Help Save a Life and Help Victims of Domestic Violence in San Antonio

     A New Study Shows Bexar County has one of the Highest Numbers of Domestic Violence Homicides in the State of Texas  

     San Antonio, Texas – December 2, 2015 – The holidays are often thought of as the best time of the year.  It is a time for loved ones, celebration, and joy.  The holiday season can also be a time of excess.  Black Friday, Cyber Monday, Shop till you drop and a spending frenzy.  The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today joined the San Antonio Battered Women and Children’s Shelter, the San Antonio Police Chief and other local leaders to urge San Antonians to donate a small portion of their holiday spending dollars to help women and children who are not safe in their own homes this holiday season.

    A new report released by the Texas Council on Family Violence shows an increase in the number of women killed in domestic violence murders in Texas by their husband, ex-husband, intimate partner, boyfriend or ex-boyfriend.  132 women were killed in domestic violence murders in 2014.  119 women were killed in 2013.  114 women were killed in 2012.  102 women were killed in 2011.  Bexar County had 5 domestic violence homicides in this report with 5 murders.  In 2013, there were 7 domestic violence murders in San Antonio.  Harris County had the highest number of deaths with 23 domestic violence murders, followed by Tarrant and Dallas with 10 domestic violence homicides in each city, followed by El Paso and San Antonio with 5 murders in each city.

    More


    Honoring Texas Victims: 132 Women Killed in Texas in 2014 El Paso County is One of the Top Five Counties with the Highest Number of Domestic Violence Homicides in the State with 5 Murders

    New Report Released During Domestic Violence Awareness Month Shows Increase in the Number of Women Killed in Texas and an Increase in El Paso  

    El Paso, Texas – October 5, 2015 - The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today released a new report that shows an increase in the number of women killed in domestic violence murders in Texas by their husband, ex-husband, intimate partner, boyfriend or ex-boyfriend.  132 women were killed in domestic violence murders in 2014.  119 women were killed in 2013.  114 women were killed in 2012.  102 women were killed in 2011.  El Paso County also had an increase in the number of domestic violence homicides in this report with 5 murders.  In 2013, there were 3 domestic violence murders in El Paso.  Harris County had the highest number of deaths with 23 domestic violence murders, followed by Tarrant and Dallas with 10 domestic violence homicides in each city, followed by El Paso and San Antonio with 5 murders in each city.

    In El Paso, Christina Bukovcik was murdered in her home by her husband Geomel Shaffa, Maria Duarte was stabbed and killed by her husband in their home, Laura Lara was assaulted by her boyfriend in his home and died at the hospital three days later, Maria Elena Sernas was shot and killed by her ex-husband Jorge Rojero in his home when she went back to retrieve some of her things and Jacqueline Valenzuela was shot and killed by her ex-boyfriend Carlos Torres.  Her 8-year-old son was present at the time of the murder.

    Stephanie Karr, Executive Director of the Center Against Sexual and Family Violence, El Paso District Attorney Jaime Esparza and City Representative Emma Acosta, District 3 joined Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry at a news conference in El Paso to unveil the annual report titled:  “Honoring Texas Victims: Family Violence Fatalities.”

    More


    New Report Released During Domestic Violence Awareness Month Shows Increase in the Number of Women Killed in Texas - Houston

    Honoring Texas Victims: 132 Women Killed in Texas in 2014 – Harris County Has the Highest Number of Domestic Violence Homicides in the State at 23 -

    4 Murders in Brazoria County, 2 in Ft. Bend, Galveston and Montgomery and 1 in Wharton County Bringing the Total to 34 Domestic Violence Homicides in the Greater Houston Area

    Houston, Texas – October 16, 2015 – The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today released a new report that shows an increase in the number of women killed in domestic violence murders in Texas by their husband, ex-husband, intimate partner, boyfriend or ex-boyfriend.  132 women were killed in domestic violence murders in 2014.  119 women were killed in 2013.  114 women were killed in 2012.  102 women were killed in 2011.   Harris County had the highest number of deaths in the state with 23 domestic violence murders, followed by Tarrant and Dallas with 10 domestic violence homicides in each city, followed by El Paso and San Antonio with 5 murders in each city. In addition, there were 4 murders in Brazoria County, 2 murders each in Ft. Bend, Galveston and Montgomery Counties and one domestic violence homicide in Wharton County in the greater surrounding Houston area.

    Houston Police Chief Charles A. McClelland, Jr., Harris County Sheriff Ron Hickman, Deborah Mosley, Executive Director, Bridge Over Troubled Waters in Pasadena and TCFV Board member, Rebecca White, CEO at the Houston Area Women’s Center and Barbie Brasher, Executive Director, Harris County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council joined Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry at a news conference in Houston to unveil the annual report titled:  Honoring Texas Victims: Family Violence Fatalities.”

    More


    Texas Council on Family Violence Salutes Travis County District Court Judge Mike Denton for Receiving a National Honor for Protecting Children in Domestic Violence Court

    The Foundation for the Improvement of Justice honors Denton with the national Paul H. Chapman Award in Atlanta

     Austin, Texas - September 28, 2015 - The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today joined the Foundation for Improvement of Justice, Inc. in Atlanta, Georgia in saluting Travis County District Court Judge Mike Denton.  He received a top national award for protecting victims of domestic violence Saturday night.  TCFV nominated Judge Denton for this award.

    The foundation has selected Denton as the Paul H. Chapman Award Winner for his work advocating and overseeing the first Travis County Domestic Violence Court.  He has been the sole judge to preside over that court since its establishment in 1999.  Initially, the court handled civil protective order hearings and criminal misdemeanor cases, but added felony criminal cases five years ago.  He has been recognized by local, state, and national levels and shares his expertise and knowledge through conferences to judges, prosecutors, law enforcement, state legislators, advocates and survivors.

    More


    New Report Released During Domestic Violence Awareness Month Shows Increase in the Number of Women Killed in Texas

    Honoring Texas Victims: 132 Women Killed in Texas in 2014 - 25 of the Victims are from North Texas; Tarrant & Dallas Counties have the Second Highest Murder Rate in the State with 10 Domestic Violence Homicides in Each County, One Murder Each in Collin, Johnson & Kaufman Counties; Two Murders in Denton County

    Ft. Worth, Texas – October 15, 2015 - The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today released a new report that shows an increase in the number of women killed in domestic violence murders in Texas by their husband, ex-husband, intimate partner, boyfriend or ex-boyfriend.  132 women were killed in domestic violence murders in 2014.  119 women were killed in 2013.  114 women were killed in 2012.  102 women were killed in 2011.  Tarrant County had a slight decrease in the number of domestic violence homicides in this report with 10 murders.  In 2013, there were 11 domestic violence murders in Tarrant County.  Dallas County had a more significant decrease in murders- down to 10 from 20 murders in the last report.  Harris County had the highest number of deaths in the state with 23 domestic violence murders, followed by Tarrant and Dallas with 10 domestic violence homicides in each city, followed by El Paso and San Antonio with 5 murders in each city.

    Kathyrn R. Jacob, President & CEO of SafeHaven, Ken Shetter, Executive Director of the Safe City Commission and Ft. Worth Police, joined Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry at a news conference in Ft. Worth to unveil the annual report titled:  Honoring Texas Victims: Family Violence Fatalities.”

    More


    2016 Young Hearts Matter Award Nominations Open

    YHM_Logo_630x425TCFV is now accepting nominations for the 2016 Young Hearts Matter awards. The YHM Activist of the Year, Advocate of the Year, and Texas Partner for Change awards recognize individuals who inspire and lead their communities to promote healthy relationships for young hearts in Texas.

    More

    2016 ED Conference Announcement

    FY16_ED_Conference_LogoJanuary 11-12, 2016 Courtyard & Residence Inn Marriott 300 E 4th St, Austin, TX 78701

    Register Now  

    More

    Man Up For DVAM Video Contest

    ManUpStill In recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM), TCFV is now accepting entries for Man Up for DVAM Video Contest. Man Up for DVAM calls for you to submit a creative video showcasing how men and boys are involved in your community and create your own impactful messages surrounding the term “Man Up.”

    More

    The Texas Council on Family Violence Praises Governor Greg Abbott, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick, Speaker Joe Straus and the Texas Legislature for Adding the Most Significant Amount of Money to Protect Domestic Violence Victims in the Last Decade

    Austin, Texas – June 22, 2015– The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today praises Texas Governor Greg Abbott and the 84th Texas Legislature for their overwhelming support of victims of domestic violence in Texas.  They dramatically increased funding dedicated to domestic violence, the most significant increase in the last decade, to address the fact that Texas leads the nation in the number of people served by programs and those seeking services that are turned away due to lack of resources.

    $8 Million Dollar Increase For Domestic Violence Victims

    The Texas Budget signed into law by Governor Greg Abbott increases support for domestic violence victims by more than $8 million dollars over the previous legislative session.

    $3 Million Dollar Increase In General Revenue

    Highlights include a $3 million dollar increase in funding for domestic violence shelter and resource center services, including  $53.9 million for core services.  In addition appropriators dedicated $3 million in Exceptional Item Funding for legal services, economic options for survivors, prevention, domestic violence fatality review and targeted approaches related identified needs within the State Plan.  Legislators realized the significant need for these services: over 84,000 people served in shelters and resource centers last year and a 31% turn away rate due lack of resources spurred this overall commitment by the legislature to providing a total of $59.9 million for family violence center services.

    $1 Million Dollar Increase- First Increase in 15 Years for Batter Intervention & Prevention Programs

    The budget also includes a $1 million dollar increase in Batter Intervention Prevention Programs funding, the first increase in 15 years and a significant criminal justice reform.  Battering Intervention and Prevention Programs offer group educational sessions to hold men who batter accountable and are designed to challenge their belief structures that support abusive behavior and ultimately create behavior change.

    $4 Million Dollar Increase to Create Domestic Violence High Risk Teams Across the State

    In addition, the Legislature approved and funded one of Governor Abbott’s legislative priorities: “High Risk Domestic Violence Teams”.   The Governor, working with legislative leaders Senator Joan Huffman and Rep. Carol Alvarado passed HB 3327 that will create these teams across the state, supplying $4 million dollars in funding for the Attorney General’s office to make this a reality.

    The Domestic Violence High Risk Teams foster a coordinated community response to the worst and most dangerous kinds of domestic violence cases.  They unite law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals, victim advocates and others at the local level to review cases of domestic violence and to identify, monitor, and contain the most dangerous perpetrators before they can inflict deadly harm.

    “This budget will further protect victims of domestic violence in the State of Texas,” said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “Domestic Violence programs need additional money to provide shelter, legal services, counseling and other assistance to protect Texans from offenders who violate the law and represent a serious risk of danger to victims of domestic violence.  We thank Governor Abbott, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick, Speaker Joe Straus, Senator Jane Nelson, Rep. John Otto, Senator Joan Huffman, Rep. Carol Alvarado and the many legislators working with the Texas Council on Family Violence for many years to increase the budget and to pass strong laws to protect victims of domestic violence.”

    Last year, over 84,000 women, children and men found safe sanctuary from violence at domestic violence shelters.  In 2013, 119 women were killed by their male intimate partner.  More than 61,000 adult victims and their children received services such as legal advocacy, counseling and other support.  Necessary state funding helps support 86 family violence programs in Texas, which include shelters, nonresidential centers and special project sites.  But the unfortunate reality remains that 31% of adult victims (11,485) requesting shelter were turned away due to lack of space.  In fact, according to a one-day census of family violence centers, Texas has the highest number of unmet requests for services compared to any other state in the country.

    More

    TCFV Praises El Paso Legislative Leaders for Passing New Significant Legislation and Adding the Most Money in the Last Decade to Protect Domestic Violence Victims

    Hear a Survivor’s Story and How New GPS and Protective Order Legislation Will Better Protect Victims

     El Paso, Texas – July 15, 2015– The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) and the Center Against Sexual and Family Violence (CASFV) today praises El Paso State Senator Jose Rodriguez, Rep. Joe Moody, Rep. Cesar Blanco, Rep. Marisa Marquez, TCFV Board Chair, El Paso District Attorney Jaime Esparza and the 84th Texas Legislature for their overwhelming support of victims of domestic violence in Texas.

    “These El Paso leaders championed the cause to better protect communities and families here in El Paso and across Texas.  They passed new laws to hold domestic violence offenders accountable and advocated for increasing funding dedicated for domestic violence and achieved the most significant increase in the last decade,” said Gloria Terry, CEO of the Texas Council of Family Violence.

    SB 737- Increases Safety by Speeding Up Protective Orders

    Senator Rodriguez and Rep. Moody sponsored SB 737, signed into law by the Governor, which requires protective orders be placed into the system within three days of being issued so that there are no longer month or longer delays in getting them into the system.  This is important because without having the orders in the database, law enforcement may determine not to arrest the violator of a protective order and lives are at stake in these cases every day the protective order is not in the system.

    “Delays in notification make enforcement more difficult and can have deadly consequences, especially when an officer arrives at the scene of a family violence investigation without knowing this crucial information,” Sen. Rodríguez said. “This is one of several bills I passed to address this and other gaps in how we protect victims of crime.”

     HB 2645-Increases Safety by Making Tampering with GPS a Criminal Offense

    Rep. Cesar Blanco sponsored a bill that makes destroying or tampering with the normal use of a global positioning monitor (GPS) in a family violence case a violation of protective order and a criminal offense. This will protect victims of domestic violence so the offender can be arrested immediately if he tries to remove the device and go after the victim.

    $8 Million Dollar Total Increase For Domestic Violence Victims

    The Texas Budget signed into law by Governor Greg Abbott increases support for domestic violence victims by more than $8 million dollars over the previous legislative session.

    $3 Million Dollar Increase In General Revenue

    Highlights include a $3 million dollar increase in funding for domestic violence shelter and resource center services, including  $53.9 million for core services.  In addition appropriators dedicated $3 million in Exceptional Item Funding for legal services, economic options for survivors, prevention, domestic violence fatality review and targeted approaches related identified needs within the State Plan.  Legislators realized the significant need for these services: over 84,000 people served in shelters and resource centers last year and a 31% turn away rate due lack of resources spurred this overall commitment by the legislature to providing a total of $59.9 million for family violence center services.

    $1 Million Dollar Increase- First Increase in 15 Years for Batter Intervention & Prevention Programs

    The budget also includes a $1 million dollar increase in Batter Intervention Prevention Programs funding, the first increase in 15 years and a significant criminal justice reform.  Battering Intervention and Prevention Programs offer group educational sessions to hold men who batter accountable and are designed to challenge their belief structures that support abusive behavior and ultimately create behavior change.

    $4 Million Dollars to Create Domestic Violence High Risk Teams Across the State

    In addition, the Legislature approved and funded one of Governor Abbott’s legislative priorities: “High Risk Domestic Violence Teams”.   The Governor, working with legislative leaders Senator Joan Huffman and Rep. Carol Alvarado passed HB 3327 that will create these teams across the state, supplying $4 million dollars in funding for the Attorney General’s office to make this a reality.

    The Domestic Violence High Risk Teams foster a coordinated community response to the worst and most dangerous kinds of domestic violence cases.  They unite law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals, victim advocates and others at the local level to review cases of domestic violence and to identify, monitor, and contain the most dangerous perpetrators before they can inflict deadly harm.

    “This budget will further protect victims of domestic violence in the State of Texas,” said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “Domestic Violence programs need additional money to provide shelter, legal services, counseling and other assistance to protect Texans from offenders who violate the law and represent a serious risk of danger to victims of domestic violence.  We want to thank Rep. Marquez who sits on the Appropriations Committee for advocating for victims of domestic violence and thank TCFV Board Chair, El Paso District Attorney Jaime Esparza for spending countless hours testifying on behalf of our legislative agenda and advocating powerfully for victims of domestic violence.”

    Texas leads the nation in the number of people seeking services that are turned away due to lack of resources and there is still more work and more resources that will need to be accomplished next legislative session.  Last year, over 84,000 women, children and men found safe sanctuary from violence at domestic violence shelters.  In 2013, 119 women were killed by their male intimate partner.  More than 61,000 adult victims and their children received services such as legal advocacy, counseling and other support.  Necessary state funding helps support 86 family violence programs in Texas, which include shelters, nonresidential centers and special project sites.  But the unfortunate reality remains that 31% of adult victims (11,485) requesting shelter were turned away due to lack of space.  In fact, according to a one-day census of family violence centers, Texas has the highest number of unmet requests for services compared to any other state in the country.

    More

    Rally at the Capitol supports full funding for family violence programs

    Gloria Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence speaks during a rally at the Capitol on Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015. The Texas Council on Family Violence and the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault and hundreds of victims' rights advocates from across the state of Texas rallied at the Texas Capitol to strongly support full funding for family violence programs and rape crisis centers across Texas.

    Watch the Video

    More

    CEO Gloria Terry talks about the Honoring Texas Victims report in Dallas

    Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry being interviewed by Univision in Dallas. TCFV released the annual Honoring Texas Victims Report during October, which is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. 119 women were killed in Texas. 38 women were killed in the DFW metroplex.

    More

    Sen. John Cornyn, Police Chief Acevedo raise awareness on domestic violence

    The Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry joins Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo and  U.S. Senator John Cornyn at an event to raise awareness about domestic violence.

    More

    Victims' families call for end to violence

    The mother of Cheyenne Green, who was murdered in a parking lot during an east Texas football game, and the parents of Kari Dunn, who was murdered in a Marshall hotel, joined Shannon Trest, Executive Director, Women’s Center of East Texas, Gregg County Judge Bill Stout and Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry at a news conference in Longview to discuss the tragic murders of their family members and to discuss ways future domestic violence deaths may be prevented and children will not have to grow up without their moms.

    More

    New domestic violence taskforce at HHSC

    The Texas Council on Family Violence is honored to chair a new domestic violence task force and work closely with vice-chair, Dr. Jeff Temple of UT Medical Branch at Galveston and the entire task force to collaborate on women’s health care and domestic violence. A meeting of the 25 member task force was held on October 8, 2014 during HealthCares about domestic violence day.

    A news conference in Austin with Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) CEO Gloria Terry and Dr. Jeff Temple, an associate professor and director of behavioral health and research at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Courtney Santana, a domestic violence survivor.  Terry and Temple are leading of a new Domestic Violence Task Force Texas for the Health and Human Services Commission.

    More

    US Marshals launch new domestic violence taskforce

    Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry speaks at a news conference in Austin with the US Marshals who launched a new task force to crack down on domestic violence fugitives.

    More

    The Texas Council on Family Violence Praises Governor Greg Abbott, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick, Speaker Joe Straus and the Texas Legislature for Adding the Most Significant Amount of Money to Protect Domestic Violence Victims in the Last Decade

    Austin, Texas – June 22, 2015– The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today praises Texas Governor Greg Abbott and the 84th Texas Legislature for their overwhelming support of victims of domestic violence in Texas.  They dramatically increased funding dedicated to domestic violence, the most significant increase in the last decade, to address the fact that Texas leads the nation in the number of people served by programs and those seeking services that are turned away due to lack of resources.

    $8 Million Dollar Increase For Domestic Violence Victims

    The Texas Budget signed into law by Governor Greg Abbott increases support for domestic violence victims by more than $8 million dollars over the previous legislative session.

    $3 Million Dollar Increase In General Revenue

    Highlights include a $3 million dollar increase in funding for domestic violence shelter and resource center services, including  $53.9 million for core services.  In addition appropriators dedicated $3 million in Exceptional Item Funding for legal services, economic options for survivors, prevention, domestic violence fatality review and targeted approaches related identified needs within the State Plan.  Legislators realized the significant need for these services: over 84,000 people served in shelters and resource centers last year and a 31% turn away rate due lack of resources spurred this overall commitment by the legislature to providing a total of $59.9 million for family violence center services.

    $1 Million Dollar Increase- First Increase in 15 Years for Batter Intervention & Prevention Programs

    The budget also includes a $1 million dollar increase in Batter Intervention Prevention Programs funding, the first increase in 15 years and a significant criminal justice reform.  Battering Intervention and Prevention Programs offer group educational sessions to hold men who batter accountable and are designed to challenge their belief structures that support abusive behavior and ultimately create behavior change.

    $4 Million Dollar Increase to Create Domestic Violence High Risk Teams Across the State

    In addition, the Legislature approved and funded one of Governor Abbott’s legislative priorities: “High Risk Domestic Violence Teams”.   The Governor, working with legislative leaders Senator Joan Huffman and Rep. Carol Alvarado passed HB 3327 that will create these teams across the state, supplying $4 million dollars in funding for the Attorney General’s office to make this a reality.

    The Domestic Violence High Risk Teams foster a coordinated community response to the worst and most dangerous kinds of domestic violence cases.  They unite law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals, victim advocates and others at the local level to review cases of domestic violence and to identify, monitor, and contain the most dangerous perpetrators before they can inflict deadly harm.

    “This budget will further protect victims of domestic violence in the State of Texas,” said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “Domestic Violence programs need additional money to provide shelter, legal services, counseling and other assistance to protect Texans from offenders who violate the law and represent a serious risk of danger to victims of domestic violence.  We thank Governor Abbott, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick, Speaker Joe Straus, Senator Jane Nelson, Rep. John Otto, Senator Joan Huffman, Rep. Carol Alvarado and the many legislators working with the Texas Council on Family Violence for many years to increase the budget and to pass strong laws to protect victims of domestic violence.”

    Last year, over 84,000 women, children and men found safe sanctuary from violence at domestic violence shelters.  In 2013, 119 women were killed by their male intimate partner.  More than 61,000 adult victims and their children received services such as legal advocacy, counseling and other support.  Necessary state funding helps support 86 family violence programs in Texas, which include shelters, nonresidential centers and special project sites.  But the unfortunate reality remains that 31% of adult victims (11,485) requesting shelter were turned away due to lack of space.  In fact, according to a one-day census of family violence centers, Texas has the highest number of unmet requests for services compared to any other state in the country.

    More

    THE TEXAS COUNCIL ON FAMILY VIOLENCE HONORS FIVE OUTSTANDING TEXAS FATHERS & CHAMPIONS FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE VICTIMS THIS FATHER’S DAY

    Austin, Texas – June 18, 2015– This Father’s Day, The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) honors five Texas champions who make a difference in the lives of victims of domestic violence in Texas.

    “Father's Day is a very important day in the lives of children all over the world.  It is a day of celebration meant to recognize the efforts fathers put into raising children, often sacrificing material things for their well-being,” said Gloria A Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “A good father makes all the difference in a child’s life.  He’s a pillar of strength and support and he leads by example. He leaves his mark as a good man on his children.”

    This Father’s Day TCFV recognizes Travis County Criminal Court Judge Michael Denton, Brazos County District Attorney Jarvis Parsons, El Paso County District Attorney Jaime Esparza, Mary Kay’s Director of Corporate Communications and Corporate Social Responsibility Crayton Webb and UT Medical Branch at Galveston Dr. Jeff Temple. 

    Travis County Criminal Court Judge Michael Denton is a relentless advocate for domestic violence victims in the justice system.  As a prosecutor he saw that domestic violence cases were not being prioritized or handled judiciously, so he ran for office to establish Texas’s first specialized Domestic Violence Court, one of only a handful in the nation.  Today, his court handles civil protective order hearings, criminal misdemeanor cases, and as of five years ago, felony criminal cases, making it the only court of its kind on the country. Judge Denton’s daughter is now 23 year’s old.  Shortly after she was born, he recalled taking a particularly heartbreaking call as a volunteer for a rape crisis hotline.  "I knew right then I wanted to make a difference in my daughter's life and in the life of other girls and women."

    Brazos County District Attorney Jarvis Parson’s was elected in 2013.  He has served on TCFV's Leadership Core of Prosecutors and spoken at the Purple Postcard press conference in support of full funding for domestic violence programs. Jarvis has pursued creative and adaptive programs to reduce domestic violence in Brazos County, like the Cut It Out program that coordinates with beauty salon professionals to talk to victims who might not respond to traditional outreach programs. Jarvis said being a father to his 6-year-old daughter has increased his empathy and understanding, and increased the level of urgency when dealing with cases involving children.

    Jaime Esparza is the District Attorney for El Paso, Culberson, and Hudspeth Counties, and serves on TCFV's Board of Directors.  His 24 Contact Program puts victims of family violence in touch with a victim advocate and an investigator within 24 hours of an offender's arrest - leading to better support for the victim and more success in prosecution of the offender.  The program is one part of his work to "change the mindset and culture" around domestic violence in the community and courthouses.  As the father of four adult children, Jaime says "My own parents modeled healthy, loving parenting and as a father, I have been fortunate to be able to lean on those very lessons so my children succeed in life."  

    Crayton Webb is Mary Kay's Director of Corporate Communications and Corporate Social Responsibility.  He serves on TCFV's Board of Directors and the men's auxiliary for Genesis Shelter in Dallas, and has spoken thoughtfully about the role of men in the movement to end violence against women.  As the father of three sons, he said, "parenthood is constantly humbling but the greatest treasure...If you want kids to be open and share, they can't feel like you are going to judge them."

    Dr. Jeff Temple is the Director of Behavioral Health and Research in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the University of Texas Medical Branch.  His research in teen dating violence and domestic violence prevention has advanced the work to eliminate violence.  As a father, he has seen firsthand the importance of teaching kids about healthy relationships from a young age.  His mantra as the coach of his children's little league teams: "respect everyone," and "be nice!"

    More

    Regional Membership Meetings

    Regional Membership Meetings are held in each region of Texas and offer members the opportunity for complimentary customized trainings, program sharing and invaluable networking opportunities for family violence program leadership and staff.

    Upcoming Trainings

    AUG 11 • Tyler AUG 14 • Austin

    Register Here

    More

    Men At Work Facilitator Training

    Presenter Lee Giordano will bring the new curriculum from Men Stopping Violence, Men At Work: Building Safe Communities. This facilitator training provides 17.75 BIPP CEU hours. June 3-5, 2015 Fort Worth, TX 

    More

    Texas Prevention Summit 2015

    TPS_Logo_FINAL_webTAASA and TCFV present Texas Prevention Summit 2015: Transforming Communities. Each conference workshop is carefully designed to deliver a unique learning experience for prevention workers and program leadership. June 29 - July 1, 2015 Austin, TX Learn More

    More